Monday, September 28, 2020

Resign now say protesters

Middle East

BEIRUT: Lebanese protesters stormed government ministries in Beirut and trashed the offices of the Association of Lebanese Banks yesterday as shots rang out in increasingly angry demonstrations over last week’s devastating explosion.

The protesters said their politicians should resign and be punished for negligence they say led to Tuesday’s blast, the biggest ever to hit Beirut, that killed 158 people.

A policeman was killed during the clashes, a spokesman said. A policeman at the scene said the officer died when he fell into an elevator shaft in a nearby building after being chased by protesters.

The Red Cross said it had treated 117 people for injuries on the scene while another 55 were taken to hospital. A fire broke out in central Martyrs’ Square.

Dozens of protesters broke into the foreign ministry where they burnt a portrait of President Michel Aoun, representative for many of a political class that has ruled Lebanon for decades and that they say is to blame for its current mess.

“We are staying here. We call on the Lebanese people to occupy all the ministries,” a demonstrator said by megaphone.

About 10,000 people gathered in Martyrs’ Square, some throwing stones. Police fired tear gas when some protesters tried to break through the barrier blocking a street leading to parliament, a journalist said.

Police confirmed shots and rubber bullets had been fired. It was not immediately clear who fired the shots. Riot police shot dozens of teargas canisters at protesters, who hit back with firecrackers and stones.

TV footage showed protesters also breaking into the energy and economy ministries.

They chanted “the people want the fall of the regime”, and held posters saying “Leave, you are all killers”.

The US Embassy in Beirut said the US government supported the demonstrators’ right to peaceful protest and urged all involved to refrain from violence.

The embassy also said in a tweet that the Lebanese people “deserved leaders who listen to them and change course to respond to popular demands for transparency and accountability”.

Prime Minister Hassan Diab said the only way out was early parliamentary elections.

The protests were the biggest since October when thousands of people took to the streets in protest against corruption, bad governance and mismanagement.

“You have no conscience, you have no morality. Go home! Leave! Resign, Enough is enough,” shouted one of the protesters. “What else do you want? You brought us poverty, death and destruction,” said another.

Demonstrators set up a mock gallows, hanging cardboard cutouts of politicians, including the president and the prime minister.